The War Report: Theorycrafting: Molimo Ramp EDH

If you’ve been following this column, I’m sure you’ve noticed that Commander has kind of become my thing. I’m up to 5 decks that are all pretty good in my humble opinion (6 if you count the other pre-made deck I bought but subsequently broke up). From here on out, I’m going to use its less official but easier to write out acronym EDH, as that’s what me and my friends (plus countless online resources refer to it as). EDH stands for Elder Dragon, Highlander — which definitely sucks to spell out but is nice and tidy when you us the shortened version. Wizards coined the Commander moniker, and though it suits the format just as well, EDH sort of rolls off the tongue. As I was saying, EDH has become my thing, and I’ve shared a bit about some of my older decks though this time around I want to highlight the one that performed so well out of the gate that it nearly went undefeated last week when I debuted it. The real treat was that this past weekend my gaming group got together and instead of our usual 3 player free for all matches we had another person join us. Apparently he used to be their 3rd and they were always looking for a 4th… well I just so happen to now be the 3rd and he became the 4th. Or however you want to look at it. Playing a 4 person multiplayer match was very entertaining, and provided all new insights into our decks and how they were tuned. I noticed that the other two decks I put together most recently didn’t perform as well with the added player, but my latest creation happens to be balanced enough for either. I’d venture to say it would hold its own in 1v1 EDH matches as well.

I started with a dual color EDH deck, and then picked up a four color. I made a couple of dual color and one tri color deck as well, and then I started thinking I should probably try a mono color deck for shits and giggles. Green seemed like the natural choice because none of my other decks were using it, so I knew I had unused rares lying around. Upon doing some further research I figured I’d pick up some cards that would help with ramp as green does it best, and then just throw out huge beaters to win the game. It turns out that this thought process would be further refined but the end result was amazing — better than I could have hoped for. So without futher ado, let’s dig into my Mono Green Ramp EDH Deck:

There were a few good options for Legendary Mono-Green Commanders, but Molimo felt to fit the purpose of what I was going for. I want ramp, and I’m talking super ramp… to the point where I have like 10 forests on turn 5 and am swinging for 10 trample due to Molimo’s passive. He does have a steep cost but in EDH you don’t have the same limitations on your mana pool, nor do you have to worry with the amount of ramp I’ve put into the deck.

Spells

Ramp:

Ramp, ramp and more ramp. These are mostly sorceries but there are a couple of enchantments that serve the same purpose — get as many lands onto the battlefield as possible as fast as possible. It just so happens that the two best ways to do that are with spells that allow you to pull out lands, and by drawing cards, that can either result in more land in hand, or more spells in hand to get more land. You see where this is going. I stuck with cards that either put the land directly onto the battlefield (as there are many options where they end up in your hand) or where you get multiple lands at once. This increases the speed of the deck and there is so much synergy with the concept throughout the years of Magic sets available for EDH. Having the land to cast the X cost creatures or those other powerful spells is the whole point of this deck, because if you do it faster than them, you’ll always have the advantage. Plus Molimo benefits from the number of Forests you control, and it only takes 21 points of commander damage to beat an opponent. With 40 forests in the deck, you can potentially one shot everyone if you manage to keep him alive.

Card Draw:

As I’ve said, card draw is equally important. Though Blue is known more for its card draw prowess than the other colors, Green is no slouch, it just typically requires powerful creatures (also at home in the color) or for other conditions to occur. I’ve tried to run the gamut here, in that there are different options that can potentially result in large card draws. In one test game, I ended up using Rishkar’s Expertise on a Hydra that was a 26/26, and nearly milled myself to death. I still won that game though, drawing my last card on my last turn and winning shortly thereafter. Good times.

Removal/Utility:

Another important aspect to any EDH deck is removal. Green is sort of lacking when it comes to reliable board wipes, but we’re hoping that speed and evasion will win the day. Having cards like Bower Passage and Sandwurm Convergence means flyers can attack or block, so that takes care of another weakness. Making sure all of your creatures have trample is a necessity, and being able to destroy some artifacts or enchantments is equally nice.

Artifacts

 

Not too many artifacts in this deck, but they suit their purpose and go with the themes of the deck. Each is designed to either provide more ramp or card draw.

Creatures

The themes of the deck are present throughout my creature selection as well. There are some that will allow for lands to be fished out, some that provide trample and other bonuses, others that benefit from the number of lands I control, and a couple more card draw options. All in all they tend to be beefy creatures that are hard to deal with, and if I get enough out on the board it’s good night.

For an easier to glance at decklist, you can see my post on MTG Goldfish. It’s a fairly budget-friendly deck to put together as well, being priced at ~$77. Compared to that angel deck I put together a while back that was floating around $150 that is. If you try this deck out, let me know how it performs for you!

The War Report: Online Resources

War… war never changes.

But technology does. When Magic: The Gathering released way back in the early 1990’s, the Internet wasn’t even available to the public. A few short years later it was, and though I’m sure some sort of online resources for the game existed, those of us in my age group were still on dial-up and lived with our parents. We couldn’t just load up our smart phone’s browser and check prices, rulings or order cards. No, we had to get in the car (ask for a ride) and take our miserable amount of wadded up cash to the local store (usually of the comic/hobby variety) to buy packs or peruse singles. Hunting for rares could take several trips, and usually it was just easier to take Timmy’s lopsided trade to get that card you really needed to finish off your newest deck. Honestly, trading was more optimal most of the time, but you did have to spend some money here and there to get new cards and/or trade fodder.

Fast forward to today — and I’m sure it’s been this way for years now, I was just away from the game for a long time — and we have the technology to do everything from the comfort of our homes, aside from the getting together to play that is (though, you can play Magic Online or to a lesser extent the Magic Duels app and stay home entirely). Those of you who happen to be reading this and have been playing the game without significant breaks will probably be familiar with what I’m discussing today, but for someone in my shoes it took some time to dig up viable resources online.

This is my short list of recommendations for online resources for Magic: The Gathering. If you are looking to buy cards, read articles and find tools that can assist you in playing the game, these links should help:

1.Wizards of the Coast: Magic: The Gathering

A good place to start is the official website for the game. In particular, I would recommend familiarizing yourself with the various formats that have developed over the years, so you know which sorts of cards you should be buying, and what you should be building towards, that can be found here.

2.Gatherer

Magic’s official database, this is gold if you know what you’re looking for. Want to find every dual colored zombie card ever created? You can do that. The sorting options are intuitive and the entire collection is represented. Also, official rulings from professional tournaments are noted on particularly confusing cards, and can be helpful when arguing over rules during games.

3.MTG Goldfish

There are many different websites out there that deal with strategy, and I have found several that I want to recommend for various reasons that we will get to. However, I find that I come back to MTG Goldfish the most. The reason being? Because they have some great articles about deck tech and brewing up fresh ideas for the game, but also an impressive database that allows you to add your collection online, along with posting individual decks that the community sees (unless you mark them as private). I have linked to my own decks on the site from other War Report posts, and I think the way it’s laid out is very cool, in that you mouse over the card names and a picture will appear of the actual card. This gives a fuller picture of what the deck does. Some of the sorting options will allow you to also see your mana curve visually, and you can judge where you can trim the fat from a glance. The cost of your deck is totaled but also broken down per card, so you can see what it will cost you if this is a deck you’re brewing, or how much your investment is worth. It’s a powerful tool and I highly recommend using it.

4.EDHREC

When I started getting into EDH (Commander) a couple of months ago, I really wanted to dive in head first and learn as much about the format as I could. I started with preconstructed decks, but instantly thought of all the possibilities this format could bring and started dreaming up new deck ideas. I started looking for EDH resources as many of the sites I was already browsing didn’t really have what I was looking for. EDHREC is one of the better sites devoted to the format. Like MTG Goldfish they have some interesting articles, but they always revolve around the EDH format, regardless of if that means diving into some other sub formats, like pauper and budget deck builds. Where EDHREC shines is in their use of a database to sort out commanders and the most commonly used cards in decks using that commander. I don’t believe every single legendary creature is represented on the site, but there are many and each will make use of different cards you potentially didn’t think of. I find it is a powerful resource to hunt down the types of cards that might synergize with the commander of your choice.

5.MTG Salvation

MTG Salvation is a similar site to the above two, but has something the others don’t. There are articles, and some database stuff, but where this site really shines is its forums. I’m not much of a forum crawler, I find that most of the time it’s a bunch of drivel and I can’t be assed to search through it. However, Google has a way of pulling bits of forums out and presenting them to you in a way that makes searching a forum manually a thing of the past. As such, I was looking for beginner’s guides on Commander and came across a huge EDH guide on these forums that was invaluable. I have since also read other threads that were of great use as well. If you don’t mind forums, I’m sure there’s a lot of gold in them hills.

6.Troll and Toad

The last time I had played MTG with any regularity was the early 2000’s. I didn’t even have Internet access at the first couple places I had on my own as an adult, so I never even thought to look into buying cards online. I still did the traditional purchasing at store fronts, but they did become increasingly harder to find as the comic and hobby store boom of the 1990’s saw a crash by the early to mid 2000’s, at least in the area where I lived. It turns out that purchasing cards online is not only efficient as hell, but doesn’t really cost any more than going to a store. There are plenty of brick and mortar options for me in the area where I currently live, so I’m not opposed to going into a store and dropping some money to support a local business (I have done so a few times since picking the game back up last fall). But sometimes card stores don’t have what you’re looking for, and in that case you need a reliable online retailer. You’ll run into the same problems online, some cards are simply not available, and oftentimes super powerful/rare cards are being sold for far to much, but that is supply and demand in a nutshell. I’ve been ordering from Troll & Toad for about 6 months and I haven’t been disappointed with the quality of cards, or the pricing. Things seem fair, and the market value fluctuates in ways that you can benefit from if you time things right. My only complaint is that sometimes the shipping takes far too long. They are located halfway across the continent from me, but I can get things in two days from Amazon anywhere in the US it feels like. I just don’t see how something ordered on a Monday would arrive the following Tuesday unless it was international, but first world problems. Regardless, from what I’ve read they have the cheapest prices of any other online card dealer, but that is their one downfall. Can’t win at everything I suppose.

I hope some of these recommendations help someone out there. I know I would have liked the pointers sooner than I got them. Happy gaming!